A LUXURY CHEESECAKE — OR A TASTELESS MASH-UP…

Fiona Scott
4 min readFeb 8, 2024
A NICE CUP OF TEA WAS MORE APPETISIING THAN THESE ‘LITTLE’ CHEESECAKES

THE SECOND week of the 2024 series of The Apprentice promised entertainment after the car crash of episode one where the girls scraped a win and the boys nosedived into a loss.

While Bristol-based Jack tried to gee up the boys for the second task, sadly his gusto proved to be ephemeral. The colourful girls, who once again stepped forward confidentially where less gung-ho.

An early start at the Royal Exchange suggested a financial task however it was a ‘foodie’ adventure — to create two styles of mini cheesecake, one for a corporate client and one to sell to the public. Yet, as always, the money would be key and it’s so often true that the upfront contract proves to be the one thing which dictates who the winning team will be.

The boys appeared to have the advantage as two of their number are pie- makers Paul Bowen and Phil Turner. Surely given that they manufacture food products they would smash this task? Well, smash was an apt word for all of the wrong reasons.

In the negotiations with the corporate clients, it was very clear that the girls were way ahead. They pitched their mini desserts at £15 a pop which seemed very high, the client talked them down to £13.80 each — when their unit cost per dessert was around £2 — a pretty decent mark-up. The star of this show was Flo Edwards who told everyone that if she was going to negotiate she wanted the rest of the team to ‘shut up’ and let her get on with it. With those results, the team listened and were silent.

Paul Bowen, for the boys, once again wanted to negotiate and be the sales person, yet got off to a horrendous start by trying to push ‘chocolate’ style cheesecakes to a company which specialises in ‘healthy’ fruit and vegetable products. When they said ‘no’ he even argued with them. He then settled at £6.60 per dessert — a master stroke of mediocrity.

The kitchen creative process was a dog’s dinner by both teams as they tried to create their promised delights. The girls’ corporate creation looked like a bright red, blood coloured triffid topped creation which just about met the cheesecake brief — the client did admit it tasted good. Their public offering was a simple cheesecake of mango mojito with mint topping — it would remain to be seen if it was too simple. The…

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Fiona Scott

Fiona has been a UK journalist for more than 30 years as well as being a freelance tv producer director. She’s also had her own media consultancy since 2008.